CREATING YOUR BOARD OF DIRECTOR RESUME

Please complete the statements below and email to lstybel@boardoptions.com


1.0 PLEASE DESCRIBE YOUR PREVIOUS BOARD EXPERIENCE. WHAT DID YOU LIKE/DISLIKE ABOUT EACH EXPERIENCE?


2.0 WHAT TYPE OF BOARD BEST BALANCES YOUR INTERESTS/HIGHEST CONTRIBUTION/ MOST PROBABLE FIT?

Please note the type of Board where you will find the best balance. Describe in detail WHY it is a good fit and what you bring to such a Board:

  1. Large Cap Public Company. Expect 100-150 hours of service at the board level plus another 150 hours per year if you are on the Audit Committee. There is a heavy emphasis on oversight. There may be 7 other people on this Board. Much of the heavy lifting is done at the committee level and you are expected to join at least two committees. The public exposure is great. And the reputational risks can also be great. But the compensation will be satisfactory
  2. Mid Cap Public Company. Same as above. Slightly lower compensation. Slightly lower reputational risk.
  3. Small Cap Public Company. Even less reputational risk. There is a balance between oversight/audit and providing advise/counsel. You might be asked to help open doors to improve sales, develop strategic alliances, etc. There is less company staff to assist you at the Committee level but the work is also less complex. Compensation will be geared towards stock options with a relatively small cash compensation figure.
  4. Private Company on the road to an IPO or being acquired. Much more shirt sleeve. Help open doors for the company. Less committee work and more work done by the full board.
  5. Private Company seeking to continue heritage. This might be a family dominated business with strong cultural values. It may or may not have an exit strategy to be acquired or grow. It has strong value. Most American businesses are of this variety. You will be an external director brought in to provide perspective, and perhaps open doors. Very little committee work. Much of the work is done at the full Board level. You must be willing to raise difficult issues that the owner wishes to avoid. Your job is to raise these important issues. Examples might include the competence of the child to succeed the parent; the CEOs unwillingness to deal with problem behavior with a sibling, etc. You would receive a salary or money for attending meetings. You might be invited to attend the Board of Advisors because the owners do not wish to be forced to be concerned about power/control issues. A nonfamily variation is a community bank or credit union. It clearly is a heritage company without the emotional drama of a family dominated company.
  6. Large Nonprofit. Hospital, college, foundation. You must believe in the mission. Not only will you not receive compensation but you will also be expected to donate money. Active committee system. There may be 20-25 people on the full board. The core work is done at the committee level. Very visible in the community. You will work with some of the more visible business leaders in your community.
  7. Small Nonprofit. Community-centric organization. You must believe in the mission. You will not receive cash compensation. And there is little committee work. Most of the work is done as a full board. You might be the most sophisticated business professional in the group. But the need is great and they value your service.


3.0 COMMITTEES WHERE YOU HAVE DEMONSTRATED SKILLS TO ADD VALUE. PLEASE EXPLAIN IN DETAIL WHY YOU HAVE SKILLS FOR THESE COMMITTEES:

Audit
Investment
Compensation
Nominating (of other Board members) and Governance

4.0 INDUSTRIES WHERE YOU HAVE EXPERIENCE: E.G. ENERGY, FINANCIAL SERVICES, TRANSPORTATION, LOW TECH MANUFACTURING, HIGH TECH MANUFACTURING, SOFTWARE, PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, HEALTH CARE DELIVERY SYSTEMS, LIFE SCIENCES.

5.0 CIRCLE THE TOPICS WHERE YOUR EXPERIENCE GIVES YOU SOMETHING TO CONTRIBUTE AT FULL BOARD MEETINGS:

Compensating the CEO and the top management team
Managing Crisis
Finding New Sources of Revenue
Initial Public Offering
Evaluating strategic alliances
Hiring/Firing CEOs
Review of financial performance
Risk Management
Succession Planning
Mergers/Acquisitions
Opening plants/offices in new regions of the country/globe
Review of corporate strategy
Major Gifts
Planned Giving
Foundation Alliances
Other:

6.0 NOSE IN-FINGERS OUT.

The role of the Board is to be inquisitive. Once a board starts telling the CEO how to do the job at a tactical level, it is time to fire the CEO or for that board member to resign. The Board hires the CEO, evaluates the CEO, compensates the CEO, and may terminate the CEO. But it should not take over for the CEO.

This non-executive role can be hard for successful executives.

If we spoke with your references about your ability to act like a Board member (Nose In; Fingers Out), what would they say about you?



7.0 KEY CONTACTS WHO MIGHT FORWARD YOUR BOARD RESUME TO BOARD MEMBERS/CEOs.

List business (not litigation) partners at law firms, partners at CPA firms, partners at compensation consulting firms, strategy consulting firms, insurance agents, people who serve on Boards, bank presidents, business owners, ministers, CEOs who serve on trade association boards, church board members, Chamber of Commerce members, etc.

Next to each name, put A, B, or C.
    A=Hot Prospect. On a board Id like to serve or well networked.
    B= Not Sure.
    C= Id be surprised if this person was helpful.


8.0 YOUR TRADITIONAL RESUME:

If you have one, please attach.

If you do not have one, please look at the link below. Fill out all that applies and I will create a Board resume for you. Stop after the section called CAREER REVIEW:


     http://www.stybelpeabody.com/ycarbio.htm



BOARD OPTIONS, INC.
60 State Street, Suite 700
Boston, MA 02109
Tel. 617 594 7627
lstybel@boardoptions.com
www.boardoptions.com

 

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